To the Crane by Bai Ju Yi (translation)

another translation from the Chinese by Mary Tang on her blog Life is But This

Life is But This 命

We don’t have white cranes in Australia, the type that is often found as a motif in Chinese paintings, often beside an evergreen pine tree; both being the symbols of longevity.  In the paintings the cranes are usually standing ‘stock-still’, but if you have seen an Australian crane, the brolga, dance, you would be in tune with this poem by the Tang Dynasty poet, Bai Ju Yi (772 – 846).

To The Crane by Bai Ju Yi

Every man has his own leaning

All creatures ought to be the same

Who can say that when you dance

You look less well as standing still

(c) Mary Tang 鄧許文蘭 2017

鶴。白居易

人各有所好,物固無常宜。

誰謂爾能舞,不如閑立時。

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